Heidegger for Architects

Informing the designs of architects as diverse as Peter Zumthor, Steven Holl, Hans Scharoun and Colin St. John Wilson, the work of Martin Heidegger has proved of great interest to architects and architectural theorists. The first introduction to Heidegger’s philosophy written specifically for architects and students of architecture introduces key themes in his thinking, which has proved highly influential among architects as well as architectural historians and theorists. This guide familiarizes readers with significant texts and helps to decodes terms as well as providing quick referencing for further reading. This concise introduction is ideal for students of architecture in design studio at all levels; students of architecture pursuing undergraduate and postgraduate courses in architectural theory; academics and interested architectural practitioners. Heidegger for Architects is the second book in the new Thinkers for Architects series.

Heidegger in America

Heidegger in America explores the surprising legacy of his life and thought in the United States of America. As a critic of modern life, Heidegger often lamented the growing global influence of all things American. However, it was precisely in America where his thought inspired the work of generations of thinkers – not only philosophers but also theologians, architects, novelists, and even pundits. As a result, the reception and dissemination of Heidegger's philosophical writings transformed the intellectual and cultural history of the United States at a time when American influence was itself transforming the world. A case study in the complex and sometimes contradictory process of transnational exchange, Heidegger in America recasts the scope and methods of contemporary intellectual and cultural history in the age of globalization, challenging what we think we know about Heidegger and American ideas simultaneously.

Heidegger and the Human

The human being stands at the center of the humanities and social sciences. In an age that some have dubbed the Anthropocene, this book addresses Heidegger's conception of the human being and its role in the world. Contributors discuss how Heidegger envisages and interprets the human being and what we can learn from his thought. Pluralistic in outlook, this volume covers a broad range of divergent views on Heidegger and his complex conception of the human. A short introductory chapter orients the reader to the significance of the question of the human in Heidegger's works, its topicality, and its relevance for interpreting Heidegger's oeuvre. Chapters are divided into three thematic groups: anthropology and philosophy; human being, otherness, and world; and life, identity, and finitude. This organization facilitates discussions of the systematic interconnection between Heidegger's philosophy and his critical thoughts on anthropology and humanism, as well as his relation to contemporary philosophers and their views on the subject. Various problems in Heidegger's concept of the human are addressed, and moral dimensions and practical imperatives implicit in Heidegger explored in discussions about intersectionality and oppression, the frailty of the human, and the embeddedness of the human being in nature, society, and history.

Heidegger and his Anglo-American Reception

This book presents both a historical overview of the absorption of Heidegger’s thought into English-language philosophical schools as well as a philosophical discussion of his thought provided by contemporary scholars. The text describes the ways in which a philosophical methodology and worldview seemingly so inhospitable to Anglophone academia has managed to find an unlikely home. This volume is roughly divided into two types of contributions: discussions of Heidegger’s reception in the English-speaking world, and outstanding examples of English-language Heidegger scholarship. The first type includes both historiographical accounts of the encounters between Heidegger’s thought and the Anglo-American world, as well as their philosophical expositions and critiques. The second group of chapters reveal the latest contemporary scholarship by contemporary Heideggerians writing in English. It is moreover the first volume to bring together thinkers from both genealogies of Anglo-American Heideggerianism appealing to students and researchers working in both of these camps.

Bhabha for Architects

This introductory book, specifically for architects, focuses on the work of critic Homi K. Bhabha, who's work has been used as a means to analyse architectural practices in previously colonised contexts. This title reveals how his work contributes to architectural theory and the study of contemporary architectures in general, not only in colonial and postcolonial contexts.

Kenosis Creativity Architecture

Kenosis Creativity Architecture locates and explores creativity’s grounding in the ancient concept of kenosis, the “emptying” that allows creativity to happen; that makes appearance possible. It concretises that grounding through architecture—a primal expression of human creativity—critically examining, for the first time, kenotic instantiations evidenced in four iconic, international projects; works by Kahn, Pei, Ando, and Libeskind. Then, in a final turn, the potentiality of architecture’s own emptying is probed. Architect and author Randall Lindstrom draws on Western and Eastern philosophy, including that of Heidegger, Levinas, Derrida, Vattimo, Nishida, and Nishitani, as well as on the theology of Christianity, Judaism, and aspects of Buddhism, Hinduism, and Islam. Every chapter expands the argument that, if responsiveness to our world is taken seriously—if proper and sustainable responses are to be realised—then a deeper understanding of creativity, and so kenosis, is essential. This book opens-up a way of thinking about creativity and humanity’s readiness to be creative. It thereby presents a crucial enquiry—at the nexus of architecture, philosophy, and theology—for researchers, graduate and postgraduate students, and practitioners alike.

Architecture, Culture, and Spirituality

Architecture has long been understood as a cultural discipline able to articulate the human condition and lift the human spirit, yet the spirituality of architecture is rarely directly addressed in academic scholarship. The seventeen chapters provide a diverse range of perspectives, grouped according to topical themes: Being in the World; Sacred, Secular, and the Contemporary Condition; Symbolic Engagements; Sacred Landscapes; and Spirituality and the Designed Environment. Even though the authors’ approach the subject from a range of disciplines and theoretical positions, all share interests in the need to rediscover, redefine, or reclaim the sacred in everyday experience, scholarly analysis, and design.

Research Methods for Architecture

While fundamentally a design discipline, architectural education requires an element of history and theory, grouped under the term ‘research’. However, many students struggle with this part of their course. This practical handbook provides the necessary grounding in this subject, addressing essential questions about what research in architecture can be. The first part of the book is a general guide to the fundamentals of how to do research, from assembling a literature review to conducting an interview. The second section presents a selection of case studies dealing with such topics as environmental psychology, the politics of space, ethnographic research and mapping.

The Country House Revisited

This monograph provides an insight into English country house fiction by twentieth and twenty-first century authors, with a focus on the works of E.M. Forster, Evelyn Waugh, Iris Murdoch, Alan Hollinghurst, and Sarah Waters. The country house is explored within the wider social and cultural contexts of the period, including contemporary architectural development. The variety of literary depictions of the country house reflects the physical diversification of buildings which can be classified as such, from smaller variants to formerly grand residences on the brink of physical collapse. Within the scope of contemporary fiction, architecture and poetics of space, the country house, given its uniquely integrating and exceptionally evocative qualities, accentuates different conceptions of dwelling. Consequently, literary portrayals of the country house can be seen as both prefiguring and reflecting the contemporary practice of living.

The Ethical Function of Architecture

Can architecture help us find our place and way in today's complex world? Can it return individuals to a whole, to a world, to a community? Developing Giedion's claim that contemporary architecture's main task is to interpret a way of life valid for our time, philosopher Karsten Harries answers that architecture should serve a common ethos. But if architecture is to meet that task, it first has to free itself from the dominant formalist approach, and get beyond the notion that its purpose is to produce endless variations of the decorated shed. In a series of cogent and balanced arguments, Harries questions the premises on which architects and theorists have long relied—premises which have contributed to architecture's current identity crisis and marginalization. He first criticizes the aesthetic approach, focusing on the problems of decoration and ornament. He then turns to the language of architecture. If the main task of architecture is indeed interpretation, in just what sense can it be said to speak, and what should it be speaking about? Expanding upon suggestions made by Martin Heidegger, Harries also considers the relationship of building to the idea and meaning of dwelling. Architecture, Harries observes, has a responsibility to community; but its ethical function is inevitably also political. He concludes by examining these seemingly paradoxical functions.

House and Home

House and home are words routinely used to describe where and how one lives. This book challenges predominant definitions and argues that domesticity fundamentally satisfies the human need to create and inhabit a defined place in the world. Consequently, house and home have performed numerous cultural and ontological roles, and have been assiduously represented in scripture, literature, art, and philosophy. This book presents how the search for home in an unpredictable world led people to create myths about the origins of architecture, houses for their gods, and house tombs for eternal life. Turning to more recent topics, it discusses how writers often used simple huts as a means to address the essentials of existence; modernist architects envisioned the capacity of house and home to improve society; and the suburban house was positioned as a superior setting for culture and family. Throughout the book, house and home are critically examined to illustrate the perennial role and capacity of architecture to articulate the human condition, position it more meaningfully in the world, and assist in our collective homecoming.

Persistence and Resistance in English Studies

Persistence and Resistance: New Research in English Studies gathers together a selection of articles by members of the Association of Young Researchers in Anglophone Studies (ASYRAS). The volume covers a wide range of topics dealing with English literature and culture, language and linguistics. Varied in content and methodology, the articles here offer valuable insights into how young researchers approach the field of English Studies at a time of crisis when the very existence of the university is at risk. The work gathered here also shows that we need to reconsider the meaning of international research. Based mostly in Spanish universities, the researchers gathered here come from a variety of national backgrounds, mainly Spanish, but also British, American, Eastern European and Chinese. They are producing research in English Studies in a global Anglophone environment, contributing at the same time – with persistence and resistance – new approaches that enhance the research produced in the geographical areas where English is spoken.

Luminous Concepts Through Design Iterations

Light has long been an integral design feature for any architectural project, influencing both the architectural form itself, as well as those who inhabit the spaces. There is a strong link between different lighting conditions and the various emotional responses of a building's occupant. Natural light is something that architects often use, however the incorporation of light in architectural design has taken a more performance-based entity in the more recent years. With the promotion of green building principles, architects have been more apt to design their lighting needs with a focus on how the building performs sustainably, which sometimes does not portray the qualitative conditions that an architect may have in mind for a space. A push for an environmental design approach to lighting needs to now consider the occupant's reaction to various lighting conditions within a space. Architects must realize the different values of importance that light manipulates at various scales within an architectural design. Both physically manifested architecture and written literature were studied in order to understand how the sun could be explored, explained and designed around in regards to architecture. The research began with investigations into architects and designers that have a strong connection to natural lighting, studying how the sun can shape and organize architecture. Through the studying of light in the built environment, as well as the psychology of human perception, this research looks to clarify what qualitative responses are elicited from various lighting conditions, gaining a better understanding of how light can become a more impactful design material at that every different scale within architecture. 'Concepts of Light through Design Iterations' looks to redefine the way in which architects and designers consider the luminous environment within the design process. Through the implementation of iterative design strategies, this methodology hopes to encourage a constant link between architectural design process and the potential power of the luminous environment.

Thinking with Heidegger

"... a real philosophical page-turner, a book that is difficult to put down, even given the complexity of its issues." -- Jeffrey Powell "This is a fine addition to existing books on Heidegger's thought.... The author has both a command of Heidegger and of how best to elucidate him to a contemporary audience." -- David Wood In Thinking with Heidegger, Miguel de Beistegui looks into the essence of Heidegger's thought and engages the philosopher's transformative thinking with contemporary Western culture. Rather than isolate and explore a single theme or aspect of Heidegger, de Beistegui chooses multiple points of entry that unfold from the same question or idea. De Beistegui examines Heidegger's translations of Greek philosophy and his interpretations and displacements of anthropology, ethics and politics, science, and aesthetics. Thinking with Heidegger proposes fresh answers to some of philosophy's most fundamental questions and extends Heideggerian discourse into philosophical regions not treated by Heidegger himself.

Architecture, Crisis and Resuscitation

Studying the relation of architecture to society, this book explains the manner in which the discipline of architecture adjusted itself in order to satisfy new pressures by society. It offers an understanding of contemporary conditions and phenomena, from the ubiquity of landmark buildings to the celebrity status of architects.

Architect Knows Best

The idea that buildings could be used to reform human behaviour and improve society was fundamental to the 'modernist' architecture and planning of people like Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier and José Luis Sert in the first half of the 20th century. Their proposals for functional zoning, multi-level transport, high-rise living, and machine-inspired aesthetics came under attack from the 1950s onwards, and many alternative approaches to architecture and planning emerged. It was thought that the environmental determinist strand of the discourse was killed off at this time as well. This book argues that it was not, but on the contrary, that it has deepened and diversified. Many of the most prominent architect-planners continue to design with a view to improving the behaviour of individual people and of society at large. By looking at - and interviewing - major figures and movements of recent years in Britain, Europe and America, including Léon Krier, Peter Eisenman, Andrés Duany, Jane Jacobs, Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown, it demonstrates the myriad ways that architect-planners seek to shape human behaviour through buildings. In doing so, the book raises awareness of this strand within the discourse and examines its different purposes and manifestations. It questions whether it is an ineradicable and beneficial part of architecture and planning, or a regrettable throwback to a more authoritarian phase, discusses why is it seldom acknowledged directly and whether it could be handled more responsibly and with greater understanding. Richards does not provide any simple solutions but in conclusion, is critical of architect-planners who abuse the rhetoric of social reform simply to leverage their attempts to secure building commissions, while being more sympathetic towards those who appear to have a sincere desire to improve society through their buildings.

Christian Norberg-Schulz’s Interpretation of Heidegger’s Philosophy

Christian Norberg-Schulz’s Interpretation of Heidegger’s Philosophy investigates the theoretical contribution of the world-renowned Norwegian architectural theorist Christian Norberg-Schulz (1926 – 2000) and considers his architectural interpretation of the writings of German philosopher Martin Heidegger. Though widely recognised as providing the most comprehensive reading of Heideggerian philosophy through the lens of architecture, this book argues that Norberg-Schulz neglected one of the key aspects of the philosopher’s contributions: the temporal nature of being-in-the-world as care. The undeveloped architectural implications of the ontological concept of care in his work prevented the fruition of his ultimate aim, transforming the ‘art of place’ into an ‘art of living’. This book seeks to realign Norberg-Schulz’s understanding of time as continuity and change to present a holistic approach grounded in Heidegger’s phenomenological philosophy; architecture as art of care. Aimed at academics and scholars in architectural theory, history and philosophy, Christian Norberg-Schulz’s Interpretation of Heidegger’s Philosophy surveys the implications and significance of the theorist’s works on architectural criticism in the late 20th century.

Gadamer for Architects

Providing a concise and accessible introduction to the work of the celebrated twentieth century German philosopher, Hans-Georg Gadamer, this book focuses on the aspects of Gadamer’s philosophy that have been the most influential among architects, educators in architecture, and architectural theorists. Gadamer’s philosophy of art gives a special place to the activity of "play" as it occurs in artistic creation. His reflections on meaning and symbolism in art draw upon his teacher, Martin Heidegger, while moving Heidegger’s thought in new directions. His theory of interpretation, or "philosophical hermeneutics," offers profound ways to understand the influence of the past upon the present and to appropriate cultural history in ever new forms. For architects, architectural theorists, architectural historians, and students in these fields, Gadamer’s thought opens a world of possibilities for understanding how building today can be rich with human meaning, relating to architecture’s history in ways that do not merely repeat nor repudiate that history. In addition, Gadamer’s sensitivity to the importance of practical thinking – to the way that theory arises out of practice – gives his thought a remarkable usefulness in the everyday work of professional life.